AHCC-Skin-Regeneration-after-threadlifting-plastic-surgery

AHCC for Skin Regeneration

Which way does AHCC contribute the most to skin regeneration after minimally invasive treatment, thread-lifting, and plastic surgery?

Skin regeneration after minimally invasive treatments and plastic surgery is a complex interplay of different immune cells. These cells are crucial for wound healing, tissue repair, and overall skin health. This is why Active Hexos Correlated Compound (AHCC) is of great importance being an essential supplement and a kind of must-have ingredient to be taken by patients before and after plastic surgery, thread-lifting, minimally invasive procedures, and other treatments where human tissue is affected (learn the details). The key immune cells that contribute most significantly to skin regeneration include:

Macrophages

  • Macrophages play an essential role in Inflammation and Repair for both the inflammatory and repair phases of wound healing. They clear debris and pathogens through phagocytosis and release cytokines and growth factors that promote tissue repair
  • Macrophages play also the role of Phenotype Switching and can switch from a pro-inflammatory (M1) phenotype to an anti-inflammatory and tissue-repairing (M2) phenotype, helping to resolve inflammation and stimulate regeneration.

Neutrophils

  • Neutrophils are among the first immune cells considered Early Responders to arrive at the site of injury. They play a critical role in the initial inflammatory response by clearing bacteria and cellular debris
  • Neutrophils activate the Transition to Healing. While they are crucial for initial defense, the timely resolution of neutrophil activity is necessary to transition from inflammation to the healing phase.

T Cells

  • In view of the Regulation of Immune Response, T cells, particularly regulatory T cells (Tregs), help modulate the immune response and maintain a balance between inflammation and tissue repair
  • Cytokine Production. T cells produce cytokines that can influence other immune cells and fibroblasts, promoting wound healing and tissue remodeling

Fibroblasts

  • Collagen is not an immune cell but fibroblasts are regulated by immune cells like macrophages and T cells and affect collagen production. Fibroblasts are responsible for producing collagen and extracellular matrix components essential for skin repair and strength
  • Wound Contraction. Fibroblasts play a role in wound contraction, helping to close the wound and restore skin integrity

Dendritic Cells

  • Antigen Presentation. Dendritic cells act as antigen-presenting cells, initiating and regulating the adaptive immune response. Their role in skin regeneration is more about coordinating immune responses rather than direct tissue repair.
  • Immune Surveillance. They are involved in immune surveillance and can help maintain skin homeostasis and prompt responses to any infections that may arise during the healing process.

Mast Cells

  • Histamine Release. Mast cells release histamine and other mediators that increase vascular permeability, facilitating the arrival of other immune cells at the site of injury
  • Inflammatory Regulation. They also secrete cytokines and growth factors that can modulate inflammation and promote tissue repair

Keratinocytes

  • Re-epithelialization. Keratinocytes are the primary cells of the epidermis and play a pivotal role in re-epithelialization, the process of covering the wound with new skin cells.
  • Cytokine Production. They produce cytokines and growth factors that attract and activate immune cells, aiding in the coordinated response necessary for effective wound healing.
The coordinated activity of these immune cells is critical for effective skin regeneration after minimally invasive treatments and plastic surgery. Macrophages and neutrophils are key for initial wound cleaning and inflammation, while T cells, dendritic cells, and mast cells regulate and support the healing process. Fibroblasts and keratinocytes, influenced by immune cells, are directly involved in tissue repair and regeneration. Understanding the roles of these cells can help optimize treatment strategies to enhance skin healing and aesthetic outcomes

How does Active Hexose Correlated Compound (AHCC) affect Macrophages, Neutrophils, Fibroblasts, T Cells, Dendritic Cells, Mast Cells, and Keratinocytes?

Active Hexose Correlated Compound (AHCC) and other mushroom-derived nutrients have been shown to modulate the immune system and support various cell types involved in skin regeneration and overall immune function. Here’s how AHCC and other mushroom-derived nutrients affect specific immune cells and skin cells:

Macrophages. Activation and Modulation.

  • AHCC: Studies have shown that AHCC can enhance the activity of macrophages, increasing their phagocytic activity and cytokine production. AHCC promotes the shift from pro-inflammatory (M1) to anti-inflammatory (M2) macrophages, aiding in tissue repair and reducing chronic inflammation
  • Other Mushroom-Derived Nutrients: Compounds like beta-glucans found in various mushrooms (e.g., Reishi, Shiitake) stimulate macrophage activity, boosting their ability to clear pathogens and debris

Neutrophils. Enhanced Function and Recruitment

  • AHCC has been reported to improve neutrophil function, enhancing their ability to respond to infections and injuries by increasing their phagocytic activity and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS)
  • Other Mushroom-Derived Nutrients containing Beta-glucans can prime neutrophils, making them more efficient at pathogen clearance and promoting a swift inflammatory response that transitions effectively to healing

Fibroblasts. Collagen Production and Wound Healing

  • AHCC: While direct studies on AHCC’s impact on fibroblasts are limited, its immunomodulatory effects can create a favorable environment for fibroblast activity by reducing inflammation and promoting growth factor release
  • Other Mushroom-Derived Nutrients: Polysaccharides and other compounds from mushrooms like Ganoderma lucidum (Reishi) can stimulate fibroblast proliferation and collagen synthesis, aiding in wound healing and skin regeneration

T Cells. Immune Modulation and Activation

  • AHCC enhances T cell activity, particularly the function of cytotoxic T cells and regulatory T cells (Tregs). This helps in maintaining immune balance and enhancing the body’s ability to fight infections and possibly reduce tumor growth
  • Other Mushroom-Derived Nutrients. Compounds from mushrooms such as polysaccharides and triterpenes can activate and modulate T cells, enhancing their response to antigens and improving overall immune surveillance

Dendritic Cells. Antigen Presentation and Immune Response

  • AHCC has been shown to enhance the function of dendritic cells, improving their ability to present antigens and activate T cells. This boosts the adaptive immune response and aids in maintaining skin homeostasis and defense
  • Other Mushroom-Derived Nutrients: Mushrooms like Cordyceps and Maitake contain compounds that enhance dendritic cell maturation and function, improving immune response efficiency

Mast Cells. Histamine Release and Modulation

  • AHCC: There is limited direct evidence of AHCC’s effect on mast cells, but its overall anti-inflammatory properties may help modulate mast cell activity and reduce excessive histamine release
  • Other Mushroom-Derived Nutrients. Certain mushroom extracts have been noted to stabilize mast cells and reduce allergic responses, contributing to a balanced immune response and potentially aiding in wound healing

Keratinocytes. Re-epithelialization and Skin Health

  • AHCC. While direct effects on keratinocytes are less documented, AHCC’s immune-boosting properties create a favorable environment for skin healing and regeneration by reducing inflammation and the risk of further infection
  • Other Mushroom-Derived Nutrients: Extracts from mushrooms like Reishi and Shiitake have been shown to promote keratinocyte proliferation and migration, enhancing skin repair and regeneration
AHCC supports immune function and skin regeneration through their effects on various immune cells and skin cells. AHCC enhances the activity of macrophages, neutrophils, T cells, and dendritic cells, promotes fibroblast function and collagen production, and supports keratinocyte proliferation and wound healing. These combined effects contribute to better skin health, improved wound healing, and overall immune resilience.

AHCC-related studies references:

  1. Pescatore, L. (2009). The use of mushroom glucans and proteoglycans in cancer treatment. Alternative Medicine Review, 14(1), 58-62.
  2. Ghoneum, M., & Jewett, A. (2000). Enhancement of human natural killer cell activity by modified arabinoxylane from rice bran (MGN-3/Biobran). International Journal of Immunotherapy, 16(2), 89-97.
  3. Kodama, N., Komuta, K., & Nanba, H. (2002). Effect of Maitake (Grifola frondosa) D-Fraction on the activation of NK cells in cancer patients. Journal of Medicinal Food, 5(2), 73-84.
  4. Ritz, B. W., Nogusa, S., Ackerman, E. A., Gardner, E. M. (2006). Supplementation with active hexose correlated compound increases the innate immune response of young mice to primary influenza infection. The Journal of Nutrition, 136(11), 2868-2873.
  5. Borchers, A. T., Keen, C. L., Gershwin, M. E. (2004). Mushrooms, tumors, and immunity: An update. Experimental Biology and Medicine, 229(5), 393-406.
  6. Smith, J. E., Rowan, N. J., & Sullivan, R. (2002). Medicinal mushrooms: A rapidly developing area of biotechnology for cancer therapy and other bioactivities. Biotechnology Letters, 24(22), 1839-1845.
  7. Fujimiya, Y., Suzuki, Y., Oshiman, K. I., Kobori, H., Moriguchi, K., Nakashima, H., & Matumoto, Y. (1998). Selective tumoricidal effect of soluble proteoglucan extracted from the Basidiomycete, Agaricus blazei Murrill, mediated via natural killer cell activation and apoptosis. Cancer Immunology, Immunotherapy, 46(3), 147-159.
  8. Zhuang, S. R., Chiu, J. H., Chen, S. L., Ao, Q. L., Chen, J. M., & Fu, S. (1998). Effects of basidiomycete immunomodulatory proteins on peripheral blood dendritic cells in chronic hepatitis C patients. Cancer Immunology, Immunotherapy, 46(3), 147-159.
  9. Kodama, N., & Komuta, K. (2002). Lentinan enhances sensitivity of cytotoxic lymphocytes to tumour necrosis factor-alpha. British Journal of Cancer, 86(4), 1101-1106.
  10. Ghoneum, M., & Jewett, A. (2000). Enhancement of human natural killer cell activity by modified arabinoxylane from rice bran (MGN-3/Biobran). International Journal of Immunotherapy, 16(2), 89-97.
  11. Nogusa, S., Gerbino, J., Ritz, B. W. (2009). Low-dose supplementation with active hexose correlated compound improves the immune response to acute influenza infection in C57BL/6 mice. Nutrition Research, 29(2), 139-143.
  12. Shimizu, M., Azuma, C., Taniguchi, T., & Imanishi, J. (2011). Active hexose correlated compound (AHCC) reduces the expression of cytotoxic cytokine mRNA in the intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes of C57BL/6 mice treated with dextran sulfate sodium. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 11, 22.
  13. Borchers, A. T., Keen, C. L., & Gershwin, M. E. (2004). Mushrooms, tumors, and immunity: An update. Experimental Biology and Medicine, 229(5), 393-406.
  14. Smith, J. E., Rowan, N. J., & Sullivan, R. (2002). Medicinal mushrooms: A rapidly developing area of biotechnology for cancer therapy and other bioactivities. Biotechnology Letters, 24(22), 1839-1845.
  15. Kodama, N., Komuta, K., & Nanba, H. (2002). Effect of Maitake (Grifola frondosa) D-Fraction on the activation of NK cells in cancer patients. Journal of Medicinal Food, 5(2), 73-84.
  16. Fujimiya, Y., Suzuki, Y., Oshiman, K. I., Kobori, H., Moriguchi, K., Nakashima, H., & Matumoto, Y. (1998). Selective tumoricidal effect of soluble proteoglucan extracted from the Basidiomycete, Agaricus blazei Murrill, mediated via natural killer cell activation and apoptosis. Cancer Immunology, Immunotherapy, 46(3), 147-159.
  17. Nogusa, S., Gerbino, J., Ritz, B. W. (2009). Low-dose supplementation with active hexose correlated compound improves the immune response to acute influenza infection in C57BL/6 mice. Nutrition Research, 29(2), 139-143.
  18. Kodama, N., & Komuta, K. (2002). Lentinan enhances sensitivity of cytotoxic lymphocytes to tumour necrosis factor-alpha. British Journal of Cancer, 86(4), 1101-1106.
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